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Guided Reading: Ways to Create Anchor Charts


Using Anchor Charts for Guided Reading Expectations and Procedures



Anchor charts help make the learning process visual for students.  There are all kinds of charts you can use and even more ways to create them.  Using anchor charts to teach students your expectations and procedures for guided reading is worth taking the time to do.  

Use Photographs

Using Anchor Charts for Guided Reading Expectations and Procedures



One of the first anchor charts I create is how to sit on a Hokki Stool.  If you are using alternative seating, this is a big one to be sure and cover with students!  I  really like our Hokki Stools, but they can be a problem for students if they don't use them correctly.  I really don't want students landing in the floor and getting hurt!


Use Clip Art
Using Anchor Charts for Guided Reading Expectations and Procedures

I like to plan ahead what I want my anchor charts to say.  That way I have clip art ready to use on them.  For me, it is easier to use some clip art than always draw if it is going to be an anchor chart that will stay up all year.  If it is a quick chart and we won't need it long, I can just draw for that.


Create the Chart with Students

Using Anchor Charts for Guided Reading Expectations and Procedures

For anchor charts to be effective, they MUST be created with the students.  If they are not, the students don't have as much or any ownership in them and will not refer to them and use the charts.  This is a bit tricky when you are creating a chart several times a day to different groups of students like I do.  So sometimes I create with one group, then fold the chart up and only reveal bits and pieces as we go with each group.  Otherwise, I would be creating the same chart over and over, but only need one to display.  

Using Anchor Charts for Guided Reading Expectations and Procedures

My book check out is needed with 4 different groups of students right now, more later.  I created it with one group and then covered and revealed with the other groups.  

Use a Dry Erase Easel 

Using Anchor Charts for Guided Reading Expectations and Procedures

Another way I create charts that more than one group will need is to use the dry erase board.  I create the chart with each group on the board, then later transfer the information to chart paper to go onto the wall.

Use Colors 

Using Anchor Charts for Guided Reading Expectations and Procedures

Using different colors to make each section easier to read is helpful for students to use the chart.  Also showing examples of what to do and what not to do makes it easier for students.  

Keep It Simple

Using Anchor Charts for Guided Reading Expectations and Procedures

For my students and I think for most students, keeping anchor charts simple and easy is important.  The more you stick on the chart, the more it can become clutter to the students and then not as usable or useful for them.  





Guided Reading: Resources

Guided Reading Resources for Teachers

Guided Reading, a part of reading workshop, is being used by a large number of schools to provide a balanced and differentiated reading structure to students.  There are a lot of resources out there that a teacher can use.  Here are some of my favorites that I think are worth using!

Guided Reading Resources for Teachers

If you are new to guided reading or just want to tweak your structure of guided reading then The Next Step in Guided Reading is something you will want to check out.  Jan Richardson provides the structure of how to run your groups in this book, plus ideas on what skills are needed for each level of reading.  She even provides lesson plan forms if you want to use them.  This is not a program, but a method of teaching guided reading which makes it great!  You decide based on what your students need on what to be teaching.

Guided Reading Resources for Teachers

After I purchased The Next Step in Guided Reading, I decided that I needed this resource of guided reading in action.  This companion to The Next Step in Guided Reading has videos you can watch to see Jan Richardson teach in guided reading groups.  If you are like me, getting to see it in action is so helpful!

Guided Reading Resources for Teachers

When Readers Struggle is a must have resource, especially if you are just starting out with guided reading or as a reading specialist.  This is a BIG book and is not a weekend read.  It is more of a go-to resource for specific teaching ideas on what to do when you have students struggling in reading or writing.  It isn't a cheap resource, so your school may want you to share it with other teachers.  But it is so valuable!

Guided Reading Resources for Teachers

The Continuum of Literacy Learning is a good resource to have as you plan so you know what behaviors and understandings students will need at each level.

Guided Reading Resources for Teachers

This is an example of what you would find in this resource.  They have recently updated this resource and now you can get it for grades K-8.

Guided Reading Resources for Teachers

Our school has decided to implement The Daily 5 into our literacy block.  We are using this book for our book study.  It is a good book and shows you how to structure The Daily 5 so students develop independence and lifelong reading and writing habits.

Guided Reading Resources for Teachers

My last resource that I have to share with you today is The Reading Strategies Book by Jennifer Serravallo.  This is another big book that is a bit more expensive than the others.  But this is a book FULL of strategies- 300 strategies, in fact!  Each strategy in the book has been cross-linked to genres, skills and reading levels.

Guided Reading Resources for Teachers

This is an example of what you can find in this resource.  I love the fact that Jennifer Serravallo included visuals.  Anchor charts, diagrams, photographs, etc...   Having the visuals are a huge help to being able to see how you could teach that strategy.

I hope you have found some guided reading resources that will help you as you teach your groups!  

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Guided Reading: Organization

how to organize your guided reading materials

How do you organize your guided reading materials?  Organization is definitely important so you can quickly grab the materials that you need quickly.   I like to have everything right by my guided reading small group tables.  I have a drawer cart and a table close by where I try to keep most of what I will need.

how to organize your guided reading materials


TEACHER MATERIALS:

My drawer cart is where I keep student materials.  I have two boxes of magnetic letters on top of my cart along with an iPad.  I use a lot of magnetic letters!

use an iPad to keep anecdotal records with Notability app

I explained how I use an iPad to keep my running records and anecdotal records in my last post.  If you missed it, you can read it here

how to organize your guided reading materials

The top of my table is full!  I really could use one just a little bit bigger.  Fly Guy is a favorite of my students so he sits there keeping us company!  I keep a big bottle of Germ X to keep those sometimes grimy or slobbery little hands from dirtying up the books.  I keep the stylus pens by my basket instead of in the student material baskets so the tips don't get broken off of the ends.  I really like the 3 drawer boxes.  I could really use them in a lot of different places! 

how to organize your guided reading materials

I have guided reading groups from kindergarten, first grade, and second grade along with my RtI groups.  This means having a lot of different materials and trying to find ways to make them work across grade levels so I don't have so many materials to keep track of.  For me, less is more!  The pom poms are for marking sounds on linking charts and for phonemic awareness activities.  Sometimes I use them along with the paint strips to push the sounds into the boxes.  

how to organize your guided reading materials

Each grade and each RtI group has a drawer in my drawer cart.  Inside the drawers (which surprisingly hold quite a few things), I keep group materials.  So when a group comes in for guided reading, I can just pull their drawer and have what I need for them.  In this drawer, I keep sight word folders, that week's shared reading book and read aloud, plus the set of books the group will be reading.  You can read about the sight word folders here.  

STUDENT MATERIALS

how to organize your guided reading materials

I keep a little basket for each student on my tables that have most everything they will need for our lessons.  



how to organize your guided reading materials

This is a better look at what all we keep in our baskets.   The paint strips are for stretching words and hearing sounds when we are writing and for phonemic awareness activities.  We also keep reading strategy bookmarks to remind us what we can do to help us in tricky parts.  I use different colors of plastic cups for magnetic letters.  One color for first grade and one for second grade.


how to organize your guided reading materials

I found these cups at Dollar General.  I went in looking for something different and ended up with these.  I think they are going to work fine.


how to organize your guided reading materials

One more important part of our student materials is the reader's notebook.  I really like having the sections tabbed to make it easier for students to find where they need to be.  We keep a LOT of learning in our notebooks!



Guided Reading: Anecdotal Records

Keeping Anecdotal Records in a binder or on the iPad

This is part three in my Guided Reading series.  If you missed Using Linking Charts or Back to School Reading Assessments or the Welcome Flip Book click the links to catch up with us!  I find that keeping anecdotal records is essential to my teaching and the students' progress in guided reading.  I use these anecdotal records to help me decide what to teach next with each student and group.  

Keeping Anecdotal Records in a binder or on the iPad

I've been a binder girl!  I kept all my records neatly organized in a binder.  Information like letters or sounds students can identify, sight words known, running records and all my notes on each student.  I kept a binder for each group.  That made it easy to grab the binder for the group I was meeting with and just keep it with me as I met with them.  

Keeping Anecdotal Records in a binder or on the iPad

I like to keep the level and percent of the books I give running records on and also the self correction ratio.  Taking notes on what cues the student is using is also valuable for what I need to teach next.  I get all this information from taking running records.

Keeping Anecdotal Records in a binder or on the iPad

My students are below grade level in reading so we work hard to learn sight words.  Keeping track of their words lets me know what work we still have to do.

Keeping Anecdotal Records in a binder or on the iPad

Keeping track of phonemic awareness and phonics skills is a great way to determine where your lessons should head next.  

Keeping Anecdotal Records in a binder or on the iPad

But now, I have to say that I have switched from using the binder to using the iPad!  I use Notability app now on my iPad.  It is not free, but it is worth the money- $7.99 I think.  This is not a paid promotion, I just want to pass on to you how easy it is to use this app.  Look how pretty the colored folders are!

The folders are super easy to set up.  I have mine set by grades using the divider tab:  Kindergarten, First Grade and Second Grade.  Then under each grade level I create a subject (student).  

Keeping Anecdotal Records in a binder or on the iPad

One of the great things about this app is that you can use the PDFs you already have and use those on your iPad.  So the same forms I WAS using in my binder, I can now use in Notability on my iPad.  You can even pick and choose what pages you want.  So the non-grade specific anecdotal records form above can be uploaded to each student.


But I don't want all the sight word lists for each student, so I only upload the ones each student would need.  
Download your file from Google Drive.  Then for each student upload the file, deselect all, then select only the pages you want to add.  I like to group like pages together for each student:  sight word lists together and anecdotal forms separate.  You can duplicate the forms right within the app so you will have what you need and not run out.   NO MORE COPYING!!  Or hole punching!    


I use the highlighter to quickly mark letters/sounds or sight words known when doing a quick assessment.  On this form, I typed in the name.  My handwriting on the iPad is not the neatest.  lol!


Besides typing and highlighting, you can use the pen to choose colors and width of the pen.  When I am writing, I like the pen on a very thin setting.  This page is for the whole group at once, so you can just create a subject- I called it All- and put forms there that would be for the whole group at once.  Just open it instead of flipping back and forth between students.  The forms used in both the binder and on the iPad can be found here.

The stylus that I use is the Musemee Notier Prime.  It has a plastic disk on the end and is the best stylus that I have found for writing on the iPad.  Those stylus pens with the round rubber tips do not write thin enough.  Another trick for writing these notes is turning the iPad sideways so the boxes are enlarged!  You can even use your fingers to enlarge the screen, write your notes, and then pinch it back to regular size.  

Now a question for you-  Do you keep anecdotal records in a binder or on the iPad?  Or maybe another way?




Reading Flip Book For Parents


Welcome Flip Book for Back to School


We had our Back to School Meet the Teacher Night and it was a huge success!  So much fun greeting students as they bring in their new school supplies and find their new classrooms!  

Welcome Back to School Flip Book and Reading Room Reveal

As students and families come to my room, I have reading folders waiting for them.  Parent involvement in a child's reading is key to their success!

Welcome Back to School Flip Book and Reading Room Reveal

Reading Folders for Back to School


I hand parents a check list to help make sure they get to see everything I want them to see and do:  pick up an information folder, check out the Seesaw app, add a book and their name to the board about what they read over the summer and get a sweet treat card with a sucker!

Welcome Back to School Flip Book and Reading Room Reveal

  Welcome Back to School Sweet treat card with a sucker!


Welcome Back to School Flip Book and Reading Room Reveal

Students and families can browse through our classroom library.

Welcome Back to School Flip Book and Reading Room Reveal

There was lots of interest in our reading tent!  It is actually a teepee that belonged to my boys when they were in school.  My students cannot wait to use this!

Welcome Back to School Flip Book and Reading Room Reveal

This is one reading area for students.  These blue chairs are super popular because they rock!

I've got several goodies for you today!  

If you would like to have the Welcome Flip Book, just sign up to receive my newsletter!  The Flip Book is editable and only available for those who receive my newsletter.  You can sign up by clicking here or by filling out the form at the top right of this page.  

Also, be sure to enter below to win a $10 Teachers Pay Teachers gift card!  You will want that gift card because tomorrow is a One Day Bonus Sale at TpT!!  Whoo Hoo!!  




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Back to School Guided Reading Assessments


What to use for guided reading assessments

Are you back to school yet?  My students start Thursday!  Where did summer go?  Every year as school gets started again, I ready things in my room for getting started with guided reading.  Part of getting started is knowing where all my students are at with their learning.

What to use for guided reading assessments

But getting all that paperwork together, printed and labeled could be overwhelming.  Sometimes all that paperwork makes me feel like the lady in this picture!  But a couple of years ago, I found the answer to this paperwork nightmare!

Using ESGI for Back to School Guided Reading and RTI Assessments

I learned about ESGI  2 years ago and it made a HUGE difference in the way I assess students and the amount of time that it takes me to prep and complete the assessments.  And I am talking hours saved, not minutes.
 
Using ESGI for Back to School Guided Reading and RTI Assessments

Today at school, I updated my lists of students.  I carry a load of anywhere between 30 and 50 students.  It doesn't take very long at all to input new student names.  Previous students are automatically graduated to the next grade level.  I just added in the new kindergarten names and reassigned the previous students to their new teachers. 

Easy way to manage and organize your reading assessments

That's it.  I am ready to begin my assessments now.  NO gathering up assessments out of file cabinets.  NO standing at the copier making copies.  NO keeping track of test results and writing out reports to parents.   


Using ESGI for Back to School Guided Reading and RTI Assessments

I don't have to make all those copies or write reports because all of my assessments are right there in the ESGI software waiting for me!  Every year, this is just ready to go.  I assess students one on one using the computer.  The students actually enjoy testing this way!  I assess on letter identification and sounds, phonemic awareness, and phonics all the way through third grade.  But you can make your own assessments and you can even create your own math assessments.  Or use the ones preloaded for you!

After I have assessed the students, I can then see how the students did.  You can see reports in several different formats.  Pie charts for each individual student or for how the entire class did- see the above picture.  Or you can view results in a bar graph.   I appreciate that their are different formats that I can use.  I have some teachers that like the pie graph and some that like the bar graphs.  I can send to the printer a different report tailored to each teacher's preferences and needs.

Using ESGI for Back to School Guided Reading and RTI Assessments

Another time saver is that you can print letters to parents with the results of their child.  You can use the prepared letter in the format ESGI provides or you can edit it to fit your needs.  Along with the parent letters, you can also print out flash cards to send home for students to practice.  That is another huge time saver- not having to print out work for practice.

Using ESGI for Back to School Guided Reading and RTI Assessments

Sending home ABC letter cards really helps parents to know what to work on and they are very appreciative of not having to create the cards themselves.

I use the assessments on ESGI at the beginning of the year, half way through and again at the end of the year to document student growth.  These assessments are used for guided reading, word work activities and for our RTI groups.  

ESGI can do so much more than assessments.  You can keep track of field trip money and permission slips, schedule parent conferences and send out reminder notes.  Even print out name tags and pocket chart tags!  This software is way more than just assessments!

This is great tool is something your school can use too and now is the time to try it out!  ESGI is running a special right now with $40 off your first year subscription.  And you will also be entered to win one of 10 TPT $50 gift cards! 

Using ESGI for Back to School Guided Reading and RTI Assessments



Using ESGI for Back to School Guided Reading and RTI Assessments

Pre-Kindergarten - 1st Grade Classroom Tools
Click the button above to enter for the TPT gift cards and to check out ESGI for your school or classroom.  It is seriously one of the best ways I have found to organize and manage my assessments for the last 2 years!
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